History Of Armenia

Historical facts, myths and legends about the History of the Armenians and the region of current and historic Armenia.
Posted on 23, September 2014 September 23 2014 2014年9月23日 by historyofarmenia
Gold bracelet with tips in the form of lion heads. Armenian Kingdom of Van-Ararat. 8th century BC.




Source: Nazaryan, G. (2014, September 11). Kingdom of Van-Ararat. [Facebook post]. Retrieved from http://tinyurl.com/lz836ld. 



#Armenian #Urartu #history #ancient #Van #jewelry #gold #Armenia #lion  #art #bracelet

Gold bracelet with tips in the form of lion heads. Armenian Kingdom of Van-Ararat. 8th century BC.


Source: Nazaryan, G. (2014, September 11). Kingdom of Van-Ararat. [Facebook post]. Retrieved from http://tinyurl.com/lz836ld.

#Armenian #Urartu #history #ancient #Van #jewelry #gold #Armenia #lion #art #bracelet

Posted on 21, September 2014 September 21 2014 2014年9月21日 by historyofarmenia
Painting: Knights of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem visiting the Armenian King Gosdantin III (Constantine III) in 1347, by Henri Delaborde – 1844.

The nobles elected Constantine III King of Armenia (1344- 1363), the eldest son of Baldwin of Neghir, who had died in 1336 in the prison-house of the Emir of Aleppo. For the first time the kingdom of New Armenia chose a ruler outside of the baronial house of Hetum. The new monarch was, however, related to the royal dynasty by his marriage with Mary, the daughter of the Regent Ochin and Joan of Anjou.
The first act of this sovereign was infamous. He confiscated the property of Soldane, the wife of John of Lusignan, and her children Bohemon and Leo, aged five and two years respectively, and shut up the princess and the two little boys on the island of Gorigos where he attempted to kill them by sending them poisoned honey. Failing in this, he ordered the three captives to be drowned. Soldane was warned fortunately and escaped with her two children to Cyprus, where she placed herself under the protection of Hugh IV of Lusignan.

Source: Morgan, J. De. (1918). The Kingdom of New Armenia (1199-1375). In J. De Morgan (Ed.), The history of the Armenian people, from the remotest times to the present day (pp. 253). Boston, USA: Hairenik Press, pref. 1918.


#Armenia #kingdom #Constantine #Armenian #Cilicia #history #read #painting #art #knight #crusade #monarchy

Painting: Knights of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem visiting the Armenian King Gosdantin III (Constantine III) in 1347, by Henri Delaborde – 1844.

The nobles elected Constantine III King of Armenia (1344- 1363), the eldest son of Baldwin of Neghir, who had died in 1336 in the prison-house of the Emir of Aleppo. For the first time the kingdom of New Armenia chose a ruler outside of the baronial house of Hetum. The new monarch was, however, related to the royal dynasty by his marriage with Mary, the daughter of the Regent Ochin and Joan of Anjou.
The first act of this sovereign was infamous. He confiscated the property of Soldane, the wife of John of Lusignan, and her children Bohemon and Leo, aged five and two years respectively, and shut up the princess and the two little boys on the island of Gorigos where he attempted to kill them by sending them poisoned honey. Failing in this, he ordered the three captives to be drowned. Soldane was warned fortunately and escaped with her two children to Cyprus, where she placed herself under the protection of Hugh IV of Lusignan.

Source: Morgan, J. De. (1918). The Kingdom of New Armenia (1199-1375). In J. De Morgan (Ed.), The history of the Armenian people, from the remotest times to the present day (pp. 253). Boston, USA: Hairenik Press, pref. 1918.


#Armenia #kingdom #Constantine #Armenian #Cilicia #history #read #painting #art #knight #crusade #monarchy

Posted on 18, September 2014 September 18 2014 2014年9月18日 by historyofarmenia
Plaque in the form of a winged lion. Kingdom of Van-Ararat. 8th-7th century BC.


Source: Nazaryan, G. (2014, September 10). Plaque in the form of a winged lion. [Facebook post]. Retrieved from http://tinyurl.com/lxpqp3m.


#Armenia #Van #Kingdom #ancient #heritage #Armenian #Urartu #plaque #lion #bird #wings

Plaque in the form of a winged lion. Kingdom of Van-Ararat. 8th-7th century BC.


Source: Nazaryan, G. (2014, September 10). Plaque in the form of a winged lion. [Facebook post]. Retrieved from http://tinyurl.com/lxpqp3m.


#Armenia #Van #Kingdom #ancient #heritage #Armenian #Urartu #plaque #lion #bird #wings

Posted on 17, September 2014 September 17 2014 2014年9月17日 by historyofarmenia
Photo: Noravank Monastery surrounded by red colored landscape.


Some text from an old German medical book Gart der Gesundheit (Garden of Health, 1470)  describing the healing properties of Armenian earth. Modern medicine has advanced quite a bit since the old days, but I think it is still interesting to read about the “knowledge” of the old. It’s an interesting book about alchemy, various herbs and their peculiar properties. The following is an English translation:

Bolus Armeniaca; Earth from Armenia. It’s a kind of marble that was once highly prized for its fineness. Herbarius in Dyetsche writes “Bolus armeniacus or red soil of Armenia is a kind of earth, it has the power to contract and stop. You have to choose Armenian earth that is totally red. Armenian earth is good against spitting blood thus: Take barley water, disband or dissolve in it the Arabic gum and dragagantum with Armenian soil. The same is also good against redness of the body. If you give it with plantain water or make a plaster on the intestine with the egg white with Armenian soil and seeds of plantain. Against bleeding from the nose, take Armenian earth and the juice of Teesdalia, mix it together and place the mixture in the nose.
From Beverwijck “Bolus Armenia and Sigillum Lemnium (so called because in the old times on the Island of Lemnos the image of the Goddess Diana was printed on that soil) are for valid reasons in Matthiolus in his fifth book on Dioscorides Chapter 73 shown as similar remedies although in the pharmacies they are usually found separately. The Armenian earth cures the bites of snakes and other venomous creatures, helps against plague-like fevers, takes away the venom from poisonous drinks, resists rotting, stops blood spitting, dysentery and galvanization. Not far from the city Vassy in the landscape of Champagne and Cuysel Burgundy there is soil dug from there baring similarities with the Armenian bole.“

Source: PeopleOfAr. (2011, November 9). Healing power of Armenian soil. Retrieved from http://tinyurl.com/kv9ukcx. 


#Armenia #medicine #old #medieval #science #book #German # GartderGesundheit #read #health #BolusArmeniaca #red #soil #landscape #Noravank

Photo: Noravank Monastery surrounded by red colored landscape.


Some text from an old German medical book Gart der Gesundheit (Garden of Health, 1470) describing the healing properties of Armenian earth. Modern medicine has advanced quite a bit since the old days, but I think it is still interesting to read about the “knowledge” of the old. It’s an interesting book about alchemy, various herbs and their peculiar properties. The following is an English translation:

Bolus Armeniaca; Earth from Armenia. It’s a kind of marble that was once highly prized for its fineness. Herbarius in Dyetsche writes “Bolus armeniacus or red soil of Armenia is a kind of earth, it has the power to contract and stop. You have to choose Armenian earth that is totally red. Armenian earth is good against spitting blood thus: Take barley water, disband or dissolve in it the Arabic gum and dragagantum with Armenian soil. The same is also good against redness of the body. If you give it with plantain water or make a plaster on the intestine with the egg white with Armenian soil and seeds of plantain. Against bleeding from the nose, take Armenian earth and the juice of Teesdalia, mix it together and place the mixture in the nose.
From Beverwijck “Bolus Armenia and Sigillum Lemnium (so called because in the old times on the Island of Lemnos the image of the Goddess Diana was printed on that soil) are for valid reasons in Matthiolus in his fifth book on Dioscorides Chapter 73 shown as similar remedies although in the pharmacies they are usually found separately. The Armenian earth cures the bites of snakes and other venomous creatures, helps against plague-like fevers, takes away the venom from poisonous drinks, resists rotting, stops blood spitting, dysentery and galvanization. Not far from the city Vassy in the landscape of Champagne and Cuysel Burgundy there is soil dug from there baring similarities with the Armenian bole.“

Source: PeopleOfAr. (2011, November 9). Healing power of Armenian soil. Retrieved from http://tinyurl.com/kv9ukcx.


#Armenia #medicine #old #medieval #science #book #German # GartderGesundheit #read #health #BolusArmeniaca #red #soil #landscape #Noravank

Posted on 16, September 2014 September 16 2014 2014年9月16日 by historyofarmenia
Painting: An Armenian Lady in Cairo by John Frederick Lewis 1855.

Lewis, John Frederick (1804–1876), painter of oriental subjects in watercolour and oil, was the eldest son of the engraver Frederick Christian Lewis (1779–1856) and his wife, Elizabeth Exton. He was born at 33 Queen Anne Street East, London, on 14 July 1804; 1805 is incorrectly given as his birth year in most previous literature. He had two brothers and three sisters. His father’s family was of German descent. Johann Ludwig, John Frederick’s grandfather, went from Hanover to England in the second half of the eighteenth century.

#painting #oil #Armenian #lady #Cairo #art #story #painter #JohnFredrick #Lewis #Woman

Painting: An Armenian Lady in Cairo by John Frederick Lewis 1855.

Lewis, John Frederick (1804–1876), painter of oriental subjects in watercolour and oil, was the eldest son of the engraver Frederick Christian Lewis (1779–1856) and his wife, Elizabeth Exton. He was born at 33 Queen Anne Street East, London, on 14 July 1804; 1805 is incorrectly given as his birth year in most previous literature. He had two brothers and three sisters. His father’s family was of German descent. Johann Ludwig, John Frederick’s grandfather, went from Hanover to England in the second half of the eighteenth century.

#painting #oil #Armenian #lady #Cairo #art #story #painter #JohnFredrick #Lewis #Woman

Posted on 10, September 2014 September 10 2014 2014年9月10日 by historyofarmenia
Photo: Geghama mountains by Edgar Harutyunyan Photography.



The Geghama mountain range is located in the center of Armenia. There have been counted 127 extinct volcanoes which comprise the range. The area is a part of the “new volcanic zone” of the Armenian tablelands north volcanic arc.

The Azhdahak mountain group consists of four late Quaternary volcanoes: Azhdahak, Kamurch, Tar and Temablur. The first three are located in close proximity, Temablur is in isolation, at a distance of 0.8 – 1 kilometer to the west and north-west.

The people you will likely encounter in the Geghama mountain range will either be Herders, Scientists or Tourists.
The Yazidis - are one of the national minorities of Armenia. Nomadic stockbreeding is their major occupation. In the rest of Armenia they also breed sheep and goats. By the summertime they move their herds up into the Geghama Mountains to feed them on a healthy diet of succulent grass and fresh spring water. These cattle produce the most ecologically pure milk, from which the Yazidis make cheese, butter, matsun, tan. They live in military tents with families and even with infants. Their language is Kurmanji, north Kurdish dialect. However in order to define their separate identity the Yazidis call their language “Ezdiki”.

Source: The Mystery of Azhdahak. (n.d.). People. Retrieved from http://www.azhdahak.com. 


#Nature #Armenia #mountain #Geghama #beautiful #volcanoe #Armenian  #Yazidis #people

Photo: Geghama mountains by Edgar Harutyunyan Photography.

The Geghama mountain range is located in the center of Armenia. There have been counted 127 extinct volcanoes which comprise the range. The area is a part of the “new volcanic zone” of the Armenian tablelands north volcanic arc.

The Azhdahak mountain group consists of four late Quaternary volcanoes: Azhdahak, Kamurch, Tar and Temablur. The first three are located in close proximity, Temablur is in isolation, at a distance of 0.8 – 1 kilometer to the west and north-west.

The people you will likely encounter in the Geghama mountain range will either be Herders, Scientists or Tourists.
The Yazidis - are one of the national minorities of Armenia. Nomadic stockbreeding is their major occupation. In the rest of Armenia they also breed sheep and goats. By the summertime they move their herds up into the Geghama Mountains to feed them on a healthy diet of succulent grass and fresh spring water. These cattle produce the most ecologically pure milk, from which the Yazidis make cheese, butter, matsun, tan. They live in military tents with families and even with infants. Their language is Kurmanji, north Kurdish dialect. However in order to define their separate identity the Yazidis call their language “Ezdiki”.

Source: The Mystery of Azhdahak. (n.d.). People. Retrieved from http://www.azhdahak.com.


#Nature #Armenia #mountain #Geghama #beautiful #volcanoe #Armenian #Yazidis #people

Posted on 09, September 2014 September 09 2014 2014年9月9日 by historyofarmenia
Photo: Scepter of King Het’um I (reigned 1226 - 1270). Made from amber and gold.

Hethum I (died 1271) (also transliterated Hethoum, Hetoum, Het’um, or Hayton from Armenian: Հեթում Ա) ruled the Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia (also known as “Little Armenia”) from 1226 to 1270. He was the son of Constantine, Lord of Baberon and Princess Alix Pahlavouni of Lampron (a third-cousin of Leo I) and was the founder of the dynasty which bears his name: the Hetoumids. Due to diplomatic relations with the Mongol Empire, Hethum himself traveled to the Mongol court in Karakorum, Mongolia, which was recorded in the famous account “The Journey of Haithon, King of Little Armenia, To Mongolia and Back” by Hetoum’s companion, the Armenian historian Kirakos Gandzaketsi.

#Scepter #Armenia #king #Hetoum #dynasty #history #LittleArmenia #Cilicia #read #medieval #gold #amber

Photo: Scepter of King Het’um I (reigned 1226 - 1270). Made from amber and gold.

Hethum I (died 1271) (also transliterated Hethoum, Hetoum, Het’um, or Hayton from Armenian: Հեթում Ա) ruled the Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia (also known as “Little Armenia”) from 1226 to 1270. He was the son of Constantine, Lord of Baberon and Princess Alix Pahlavouni of Lampron (a third-cousin of Leo I) and was the founder of the dynasty which bears his name: the Hetoumids. Due to diplomatic relations with the Mongol Empire, Hethum himself traveled to the Mongol court in Karakorum, Mongolia, which was recorded in the famous account “The Journey of Haithon, King of Little Armenia, To Mongolia and Back” by Hetoum’s companion, the Armenian historian Kirakos Gandzaketsi.

#Scepter #Armenia #king #Hetoum #dynasty #history #LittleArmenia #Cilicia #read #medieval #gold #amber

Posted on 08, September 2014 September 08 2014 2014年9月8日 by historyofarmenia
Photo:  Mardik Martin, September 16, 1936, Iran.


Mardik Martin (born September 16, 1936),[1] is an American screenwriter of Armenian descent. He was born in Iran and raised in Iraq.
Mardik Martin is in the elite group of screenwriters on WGA’s list of 101 Greatest Screenplays ever written. He immigrated to the United States from Iraq to attend New York University. 
Although his family in Iraq was wealthy, he fled the country to avoid the draft and arrived in New York in a penniless state. In his book on the New Hollywood, Peter Biskind states that Martin had to wash dishes to pay his way through NYU, where he met fellow student Martin Scorsese in 1961. The two formed a close friendship and worked together on Scorsese’s early projects such as It’s Not Just You, Murray! and the semi-autobiographical Season of the Witch which ultimately became Mean Streets. According to Biskind, “The two young men sat in Martin’s Valiant and wrote. In the winter, in the cold and snow.”

He won the Mahler award and graduated with a Master’s degree in 1968 and then went on to teach screen-writing at NYU from 1968 to 1973. 

Mardik moved to Hollywood that year (1973) after Mean Streets (1973), which he co-wrote with Martin Scorsese, became a huge hit. He worked for Chartoff-Winkler Productions in the years following, writing screenplays like Valentino (1977) and collaborating with Scorcese, again, on The Last Waltz (1978), before writing the first three drafts of Raging Bull (1980). Now semi-retired, Martin works as a Senior Lecturer at the prestigious USC film school, having mentored and taught thousands of the brightest young luminaries in the movie business.

Source: IMDb. (n.d.). Mardik Martin. Retrieved from http://tinyurl.com/ljntrd6 




#Armenian #movie #screenwriter #MardikMartin #Scorsese #Hollywood #read #USA #NY #writer

Photo: Mardik Martin, September 16, 1936, Iran.


Mardik Martin (born September 16, 1936),[1] is an American screenwriter of Armenian descent. He was born in Iran and raised in Iraq.
Mardik Martin is in the elite group of screenwriters on WGA’s list of 101 Greatest Screenplays ever written. He immigrated to the United States from Iraq to attend New York University.
Although his family in Iraq was wealthy, he fled the country to avoid the draft and arrived in New York in a penniless state. In his book on the New Hollywood, Peter Biskind states that Martin had to wash dishes to pay his way through NYU, where he met fellow student Martin Scorsese in 1961. The two formed a close friendship and worked together on Scorsese’s early projects such as It’s Not Just You, Murray! and the semi-autobiographical Season of the Witch which ultimately became Mean Streets. According to Biskind, “The two young men sat in Martin’s Valiant and wrote. In the winter, in the cold and snow.”

He won the Mahler award and graduated with a Master’s degree in 1968 and then went on to teach screen-writing at NYU from 1968 to 1973.

Mardik moved to Hollywood that year (1973) after Mean Streets (1973), which he co-wrote with Martin Scorsese, became a huge hit. He worked for Chartoff-Winkler Productions in the years following, writing screenplays like Valentino (1977) and collaborating with Scorcese, again, on The Last Waltz (1978), before writing the first three drafts of Raging Bull (1980). Now semi-retired, Martin works as a Senior Lecturer at the prestigious USC film school, having mentored and taught thousands of the brightest young luminaries in the movie business.

Source: IMDb. (n.d.). Mardik Martin. Retrieved from http://tinyurl.com/ljntrd6


#Armenian #movie #screenwriter #MardikMartin #Scorsese #Hollywood #read #USA #NY #writer

Posted on 07, September 2014 September 07 2014 2014年9月7日 by historyofarmenia
Illustration: The Legend of the Birth of Ararat.
The god of fire, Vahagn was a perfect being, but he had an explosive, troublesome temper. No wonder that even his birth was marked by a cosmic shake of the Universe. The gods truly rejoiced the day Vahagn was born. He received many gifts from them. Beautiful Astghik* planted a kiss of love on his forehead and tied the Cross of War woven out of stars to his hand, so the power of the fire god would be everlasting. The dazzling Mihr* gave him a heavy mace, forged out of a thousand and one suns. The new god really liked that toy. He immensely enjoyed flying across the sky like a fiery whirlwind, waving his mace.

One day, Vahagn threw his mace and as usual went looking for it. He had searched across many planets before he reached Earth. There, the god found his mace stuck above a valley. When he came closer, he saw how bright the sun was gleaming on its spikes, surrounded by lush greenery and he was mesmerized by the beauty of it.
“How wonderful it is here! This is the right mountain and valley!” he heard the approaching goddess Astghik.
“And we were wondering how to find a good place for the earthly god to be born!” laughed Tir*.
At that time, the gods were traveling across the world in search of a place to put the cradle of the first earthly god. So they decided that the first earthly god could be born there and his name would be Hayk. Vahagn was charged with lighting the sun directly above the cradle, so it would be bright and warm. And that place that they called Ararat was so wonderful that even the gods themselves came down there to walk along the picturesque slopes.
Source: 100Legends. (n.d.). The Legend of the Birth of Ararat [Illustration]. Retrieved from http://tinyurl.com/ox2lfxc

Illustration: The Legend of the Birth of Ararat.

The god of fire, Vahagn was a perfect being, but he had an explosive, troublesome temper. No wonder that even his birth was marked by a cosmic shake of the Universe. The gods truly rejoiced the day Vahagn was born. He received many gifts from them. Beautiful Astghik* planted a kiss of love on his forehead and tied the Cross of War woven out of stars to his hand, so the power of the fire god would be everlasting. The dazzling Mihr* gave him a heavy mace, forged out of a thousand and one suns. The new god really liked that toy. He immensely enjoyed flying across the sky like a fiery whirlwind, waving his mace.

One day, Vahagn threw his mace and as usual went looking for it. He had searched across many planets before he reached Earth. There, the god found his mace stuck above a valley. When he came closer, he saw how bright the sun was gleaming on its spikes, surrounded by lush greenery and he was mesmerized by the beauty of it.

“How wonderful it is here! This is the right mountain and valley!” he heard the approaching goddess Astghik.

“And we were wondering how to find a good place for the earthly god to be born!” laughed Tir*.

At that time, the gods were traveling across the world in search of a place to put the cradle of the first earthly god. So they decided that the first earthly god could be born there and his name would be Hayk. Vahagn was charged with lighting the sun directly above the cradle, so it would be bright and warm. And that place that they called Ararat was so wonderful that even the gods themselves came down there to walk along the picturesque slopes.

Source: 100Legends. (n.d.). The Legend of the Birth of Ararat [Illustration]. Retrieved from http://tinyurl.com/ox2lfxc

Posted on 06, September 2014 September 06 2014 2014年9月6日 by historyofarmenia
Photo: Tigranes II “the Great” (95-56 B.C.), Kingdom of Armenia, Silver Tetradrachm, Diadem and draped bust of Tigranes II facing right, wearing an Armenian tiara ornamented with a star between two eagles. On the reverse side is Tyche of Antioch seated right on a rock, holding a palm-branch, river god Orontes swimming below to right, monogram on rock and in field.


Tigranes II “the Great” was one of the finest kings of ancient Armenia. At its height, his empire extended from the Pontic Alps (in modern north-eastern Turkey) to Mesopotamia, and from the Caspian Sea to the Mediterranean. Tigranes invaded territories as far away as Ecbatana and took the title King of Kings which, at the time, according to their coins, even the Parthian kings did not assume. He was called “Tigranes the Great” by many historians and writers, such as Plutarch. The “King of Kings” never appeared in public without having at least four kings attending him. Cicero, referring to his success in the east, said that he “made the Republic of Rome tremble before the prowess of his arms.”


Sources: PeopleOfAr. (2013, Augustus 19). Tigranes the Great, 140–55 BC. Retrieved from http://tinyurl.com/ldwa6bd.



#Armenian #monarchy #Armenia #king #Tigran #TigranesTheGreat #coin #ancient #history #silver #Tetradrachm #heritage

Photo: Tigranes II “the Great” (95-56 B.C.), Kingdom of Armenia, Silver Tetradrachm, Diadem and draped bust of Tigranes II facing right, wearing an Armenian tiara ornamented with a star between two eagles. On the reverse side is Tyche of Antioch seated right on a rock, holding a palm-branch, river god Orontes swimming below to right, monogram on rock and in field.


Tigranes II “the Great” was one of the finest kings of ancient Armenia. At its height, his empire extended from the Pontic Alps (in modern north-eastern Turkey) to Mesopotamia, and from the Caspian Sea to the Mediterranean. Tigranes invaded territories as far away as Ecbatana and took the title King of Kings which, at the time, according to their coins, even the Parthian kings did not assume. He was called “Tigranes the Great” by many historians and writers, such as Plutarch. The “King of Kings” never appeared in public without having at least four kings attending him. Cicero, referring to his success in the east, said that he “made the Republic of Rome tremble before the prowess of his arms.”


Sources: PeopleOfAr. (2013, Augustus 19). Tigranes the Great, 140–55 BC. Retrieved from http://tinyurl.com/ldwa6bd.

#Armenian #monarchy #Armenia #king #Tigran #TigranesTheGreat #coin #ancient #history #silver #Tetradrachm #heritage